Children’s Vegetable Garden: Week 11, November 17, 2018

Hi Friends!

Well, we ended up having a SERIOUS FREEZE this past week. I don’t think anyone expected this past week’s freeze to be as bad as it was, but here we are. SO, unfortunate as it is, our plots all took a huge hit. Take a look:

All in all, we all lost our squash, beans, tomatoes, cucumbers and many if not all of the marigolds.

We ended up removing all the dead plants from our plots. We cut the tomatoes right at the soil line and to let the stem & roots dry out before we pull them. As we removed the tomato plants, many people had to clean up an even bigger mess as the post-freeze cherry tomatoes fell from the vine.

There is some good news though – many of the plants survived!

Our cold loving cole crops (cabbage, cauliflower & broccoli), carrots, radishes, cilantro and lettuce all survived the freeze. WHEW!

Many of us were even able to harvest some really pretty radishes:

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The weather was even warm enough for some of our volunteers to plant some really healthy looking spinach, which almost makes up for the losses we took. (KIDDING! … but not really)

Finally, one of my personal favorite JMG presentations, we had the pleasure of hearing from a family of young 4-H members who raise turkeys! Hearing them explain the food, water, shelter, temperature and time commitment needs that are all required in raising healthy turkeys was really interesting. PLUS THEY BROUGHT BABY TURKEYS, which is basically a slow pitch down the middle for our young gardeners.

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That’s all for this week, friends. Be sure to check back in next week to see how our post freeze garden is faring!

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Children’s Vegetable Garden Program: Week 10, November 10, 2018

Hi Friends!

This weekend was COLD COLD COLD. But our plants were still super happy! Check out our marigolds, which are always so beautiful this time of year. Although it’s really hard to do, the best thing you can do for your marigolds is to dead head them (pinch off the blooms) each week to encourage blooming and new growth all season long. I am acknowledging how hard this is for me to, but it truly makes a big difference.

This week’s agenda did not include any new planting, unless you needed to reseed any of your cilantro, carrots, leaf lettuce or radishes. Ours were looking good (although the carrots had not come up yet!):

One of the big chores we needed to do today was to check for bugs, both bad and good ones. Of course, we came up with a bunch of both!

First, take a look at our beautiful pollinator butterflies! The fall monarch migration did not disappoint this year and they were out in force at SABOT. The little green butterfly we found incognito our peas looks like a Sulpher, but also could be a Southern Dogface – I certainly can’t tell. Any ideas?

Check out some of the other bugs we found:

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We found some cucumber bugs, some grasshoppers and possibly a wooly bear caterpillar (?) – I’m not sure on the identification of that caterpillar but would welcome suggestions!! Finally, we’ve got some type of cocoon nesting in our pea leaves!
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Take a look at some other bad bugs to look out for:

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Before we left, after we made sure to check out all our cole crops for loopers, we fertilized with one cup of granulated fertilizer spread out around all 6 plants (2 cabbage, 2 broccoli and 2 cauliflower). Finally, we completed the following:

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That’s all we’ve got for now friends, and before you go, take a look at our harvest this week!! Make sure to check back in next week to see our garden’s progress!

Children’s Vegetable Garden Program (CVGP) Week 9, November 3, 2018

It does not matter if you are a rose or a lotus or a marigold.  What matters most is that you are flowering. 

Rajneesh

After all the heavy rains it was a fabulous fall day at the SABOT Children’s Garden! Taishan Orange Mari-mums planted in week three were in full bloom to greet the gardeners as the day commenced.  Careful deadheading insured the blooms will continue over the remainder of the session.IMG_0679

Fiskars scissors do the trick!

The kids were eager to remedy any damage caused by too much moisture or invasive insects.  Most notably, the tomato plants had suffered a minor invasion of pinworms:

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Tomato pinworm (aka Keiferia lycopersicella) https://texasinsects.tamu.edu/tomato-pinworm/

Junior Garden Volunteers Josh and Alexie took a break from compost shoveling for a quick photo op:

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The “AllStar Gourmet” Lettuce mix planted in Session 6 was popping up in rows of purple and green in every plot.lettuce 11-3 Lettuce spray……

Cruiser cilantro only required minor cultivating…….

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Follow the blog post for Cruiser Cilantro for a quick and delicious salsa recipe!

Happy Gardening and Cooking!

Anne Marie S