Children’s Vegetable Garden Program (CVGP) Week 4, March 23rd 2019

Hello all!

Announcement!!: Want to know if Saturday’s session is cancelled? Cancellation notifications will now be posted/updated here on the Children’s Vegetable Garden Program Blog!

This past Saturday at the Children’s Garden was another beautiful day. We were blessed with cool weather and sun, even though rain was in the forecast all morning. What a great day!

As soon as the families arrived, we were on to our garden chores. David requested that we make sure that our plots and section walkways were free of any weeds, trash, or rocks.

We also checked our plants for any damaged leaves, insects, and tied up stems and leaves.

We scratched up the soil to a depth of 4 inches inside our plots and the area between your irrigation on/off valve with a four tine cultivator as well as a minimum of six inches away from anything that has been planted. This will help minimize the caking of the soil and help with soil drainage and watering. Remember, we are not tilling or digging deep into the soil. Plots should look nice and leveled with no craters.

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We flagged any fire ant activity throughout the garden and our Section Leaders will treat them at the end of today’s session.

How Do Your Plants Look?

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‘Green Magic’ Broccoli:

  • This is the last day to replace any of your plants.
  • Make sure your plant is nice and straight.
  • Water your plant in real good, but do not get the foliage wet.
  • Fertilize each plant with a quarter-gallon of liquid Hasta Gro fertilizer.
  • Gently drench all your plants leaves with Spinosad. This is an expensive product, so let’s use it wisely.

HM 8849’ and ‘Ruby Crush’ Tomatoes:

  • Does your tomato cage shake a lot? If so, anchor it down correctly.
  • Open up the cloth on your cages and see how your plants are growing.
  • Do any of your plants need to be replaced? If so, this is the last week to do so.
  • Cut off any stems/leaves that might be touching the soil.
  • If your top snapped off any of your plants, cut it off.
  • Is your plant nice and straight? Does it need another anchor stake?
  • Water your plant in real good, but do not get the foliage wet.
  • Fertilize each plant with a half-gallon of liquid Hasta Gro fertilizer.
  • Make sure to properly re-wrap your clothes on their cages nice and tight.

Today’s Plantings!

Petunias

We handled the plants carefully not to disturb the root system and used the irrigation on/off valve located at the front of our plots as a guideline.We do not want to disturb or damage their root system.


Fun fact from Mr. David Rodriguez: Did you know that petunias and tomatoes are in the same family of plants?

Carefully, we pre-soaked the entire 6–pack of petunia transplants in a bucket of water, filled to the lip of their root ball, until all the air bubbles came out.

Next, we scratched up the planting zonses, applied compost and a cup of Espoma granulated organic fertilizer to it.

Two plants were evenly spaced and planted on each side of the irrigation line and about 4 inches away from the top and bottom of the plot.

Plant your petunia plants a little bit above the soil line. DO NOT remove the peat pot. Firm the plants well, but take caution not to breaking any of their runners or damage any leaves.

Looks like these need to be replanted. Since the peat pots were exposed, they are starting to dry out a lot faster. 

The challenge in planting here is the irrigation lines cannot water these plants. We have to keep a good eye on them and water with the water can.

 

Yellow Squash and Zucchini

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Three seeds squash were sown to the right of the tomato plant and  4 zucchini seeds next to the cucumber trellis.

We evenly spaced out the seeds starting from the top to the bottom of the plot. We used bamboo stakes as guide references.


Each seed was gently planted just below the soil surface with its point barely below the soil surface.

*Make sure that these are not planted too deep; the soil is firmed in well on the top and that they are lightly watered in.*

No seeds should be visible after a real light watering and of couse we put out your plant tags.

Next, we applied one full cup of Espoma granulated fertilizer to this allocated planting area and very lightly scratch it in.

Homework Assignment: Study up on purple martins.

This was all our chores we had for the day. What fun 🙂

 

Extra Pics

Just wanted to throw in some additional pics from our research plots and large container bins.

The Maroon Poppies are looking great!

Check out all the swallow tail caterpillars we have on our dill!!

And our Bluebonnets! We didn’t intentionally plant them this season. They keep reseeding every year and look at all the pretty colors they come in!! Have you ever seen a pink Bluebonnet? How about a purple Bluebonnet?

See you for Week 5 post!!!

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